Registrations Policy

Applicants for .ie domains are required to provide supporting information to confirm their identity and show a valid claim to their chosen domain name.

The domain name being registered must relate to the applicant or their activities. The categories below are provided as a guideline to help determine what information may be required.

If the connection between the applicant and the domain name is not clear based on information provided, the IEDR can request additional documentation to explain what the proposed domain name means and how it relates to the applicant.

All applicants for a .ie domain name who are not based in the 32 counties of Ireland, must demonstrate a real and substantive connection with Ireland (with the exception of those applying by means of a European Community Trademark).

Acceptable documentation demonstrating trade or commercial activity includes:

  • Copies of invoices showing trade to or from Ireland
  • Product or service brochures showing an intention to trade in Ireland.
  • A signed letter on headed paper from a bank manager, firm of chartered accountants, registered auditors, tax consultants (where the tax advisor identification number is displayed), or solicitors confirming the applicants trade with Ireland.

Personal Names

Individuals who are Irish citizens, or reside in the 32 counties of Ireland, can register their own personal name as a .ie domain name. Applications can be supported by a wide range of documents as stated below.

If you are based in the Republic of Ireland:

  • Irish passport
  • Irish driver’s licence
  • Irish revenue/social welfare document showing PPS number
  • Irish birth certificate
  • Irish marriage certificate
  • Irish utility bill (e.g. UPC, SKY, Electric Ireland, Airtricity, Bord Gais, Eircom, Vodafone, O2, Meteor, etc.)

If you are based in Northern Ireland:

  • UK driver’s licence with Northern Ireland address
  • HM Revenue & Customs / Northern Ireland Social Security Agency document showing National Insurance number
  • Northern Ireland birth certificate
  • Northern Ireland marriage certificate
  • Northern Ireland utility bill (e.g. UPC, SKY, Electric Ireland, Airtricity, Bord Gais, Eircom, Vodafone, O2, Meteor, etc.)

Personal domain names must consist of one of the following formats:

Johnsmith.ie [first name / surname]
Johnpaulsmith.ie [first name / middlename / surname]
John-smith.ie [first name / – / surname]
John-paul-smith.ie [first name / – / middlename / – / surname]
Johnpsmith.ie [first name / middle initial / surname]
John-p-smith.ie [first name / – / middle initial / – / surname]
Jsmith.ie [first initial / surname]
Jpsmith.ie [first initial / middle initial / surname]
Jp-smith.ie [first initial / middle initial / – / surname]
J-smith.ie [first initial / – / surname]
J-p-smith.ie [first initial / – / middle initial / – / surname]
Paulsmith.ie [middlename / surname]
Paul-smith.ie [middlename / – / surname]
Psmith.ie [middle initial / surname]
P-smith.ie [middle initial / – / surname]

Double-barrel name:

The same policy applies regarding double-barrel names. That is, any documentation provided that supports the double-barrel name, or a variation of both or either surname, can be accepted. For example:

JohnSmithMurphy.ie [first name / surname]
Johnpaulsmithmurphy.ie [first name / middlename /surname]
JohnSmith-Murphy.ie [first name / – /surname]

Corporate Names

An incorporated company can register a domain name to reflect their corporate name. If based in Ireland the company only needs to include their company number or Certificate of Incorporation to verify their company’s existence. If the company is incorporated outside of Ireland applicants can include a copy of their certificate of incorporation or their company number if they are based in the United Kingdom or the United States.

Corporate domains can be registered around the following areas:

  • An applicant can add words to their registered company name to form a domain name. If the additional words do not clearly relate to the company or its activities, additional documentation may be required to explain the company’s claim to the domain.
  • An applicant can register domain names that have a reasonable connection with their business. In this case the IEDR deems a reasonable connection to be a product or service of the company.
  • An abbreviation of the corporate name may be used instead of the full corporate name.

Registered Trademarks

Any applicant with a registered trademark is eligible to apply to register a .ie domain under this category. If your trademark is registered in Ireland, the UK, the USA or the European Community you simply need to include your trademark number with your domain application. A copy of the official trademark certificate must be included with the application for trademarks registered outside these jurisdictions.

Applications made on the basis of a pending trademark application will require a copy of the trademark application form and official filing receipt, along with a letter from the trademark holder in order to be successfully registered. If you are applying for a domain as a licensed user of the trademark, you must provide a signed letter on headed paper from the trademark holder authorising you  to register the related .ie domain.

The domain name must correspond closely with the trademark, but may include plurals, descriptors, or non-descriptive elements such as numbers or letters and may also differ in respect of signs, symbols or punctuation. Additional documentation may be required if the connection between the proposed domain and the trademark is not clear.

Important Note:

  • A CTM (Community Trademark) provides a connection to Ireland automatically.
  • A WIPO (World Intellectual Property Organisation) trademark may include Ireland (IE) in its listing which will also serve as a connection to Ireland.
  • All other trademarks must also provide a connection to Ireland in order to be approved.

Registered Business Names

A Sole Trader, Company or Unincorporated Association who hold a registered business name can apply for a .ie domain name by including their Registered Business Number (RBN) with their application.

Domains can be registered using a RBN in the following ways:

  • You can add words to their registered business name to form a domain name.  If the additional words do not clearly relate to the business, additional documentation may be required to explain the applicant’s claim to the domain.
  • An applicant can register domain names that have a reasonable connection with their business. In this case the IEDR deems a reasonable connection to be a product or service of the registered business.
  • An abbreviation of the registered business name may be used instead of the full business name.

In order for applications to be successfully processed applicants should ensure that:

  • Their RBN can be confirmed online. If the applicant has a copy of their RBN certificate or a copy of all pages of the application form stamped by the Companies Registration Office (CRO), copies of these documents can be sent to the IEDR.
  • If you have only recently applied for your RBN you must provide a copy of your Customer Receipt from the CRO, showing your name as the business owner, with your application. Alternatively you can provide us with the Submission Number printed on your receipt, which will be verified online before being accepted if correct.
  • If your business is based in Northern Ireland and does not have a RBN the IEDR may accept a VAT number or a signed letter on headed paper from a bank manager, chartered accountants, registered auditors, tax consultants or solicitors confirming that the company is currently trading, or has serious intention and commitment to trade shortly, under the business name that is specified. The letter must state the name of the company and that they are trading, or intend to trade, under the business name in question.

State Agency Names

The IEDR defines a state agency as any person, body, entity or office established pursuant to Bunreacht na h-Eireann, an Act of Parliament, Secondary Legislation or established by the Northern Ireland Assembly. This includes any other state body, agency or department, including state hospitals, semi-state bodies, VEC’s and local authorities. All of the above are eligible to apply for a .ie domain name in English, Irish or both languages, which reflects their name. A state agency may apply for a domain name to reflect the name of a project, special event, or joint venture where at least one of the parties involved is a state agency. If the IEDR can verify that the applicant is a state agency or statutory body then no supporting documentation will be required with the application.

Publications

A Sole Trader, Company, Unincorporated Association, State Agency or Educational Institution that publishes or writes periodicals, magazines, trade journals, e-zines or books is eligible to apply for a .ie domain name.

Applications should include an emailed or faxed copy of a page from the publication where the applicant is stated as the writer or publisher of the publication. If the publication is online only then you can include a link to the publication or screen shots of the website/e-zine with your application. If the publication does not clearly show that the applicant is the writer or publisher of the publication then the applicant must provide a signed letter on headed paper from an Irish firm of chartered accountants, registered auditors, tax consultants, or solicitors confirming this.

Educational Institution Names

A primary or secondary level school or any other educational institution that is recognised as such by the Department of Education is entitled to register a .ie domain name. If this is the case you can simply apply for a domain name without supporting documentation. If you are not currently recognised by the Department of Education you can submit a self-issued letter on your letterhead with your application.

Politician Names

Any politician representing the 32 counties or any member of the Northern Ireland Assembly can apply for a .ie domain name with a signed letter, on official letterhead, from the politician confirming their eligibility to register a domain name in this category. Additionally any person officially contesting an office or electoral seat is also eligible to apply for a domain name in the run up to an election.

Any registrant who ceases to be a sitting politician, or who fails to be elected, must have their domain name de-activated after due notice. A politician’s name may be registered in either one of the following formats:

  • seanmuldoon.ie (personal name without title)
  • smuldoon.ie (initial with surname)
  • seanmuldoontd.ie or seanmuldoonmep.ie (personal name with politician title).

Club or Society Names

An unincorporated association that is not legally obliged to have a registered business name (i.e. a club or society) is entitled to register a .ie domain name. The IEDR requires a self issued letter from the applicant on the club or society letterhead stating that they are an Unincorporated Association and require the referenced .ie domain name to reflect their organisation name.

Personal Trading Names

Sole Traders, such as Authors, Designers, Entertainers, Artists, Photographers, Journalists etc, trading in Ireland under their Personal Names are eligible to apply for a .ie domain name. The domain name can be the full name of a sole trader (e.g. johnsmith.ie) or the surname only of the sole trader (e.g. smith.ie).

In order to apply for a personal trading name domain you will need any of the below:

  • A VAT number.
  • Documentation showing that the applicant is registered for Income Tax.
  • A signed letter on headed paper from an Irish bank manager, firm of chartered accountants, registered auditors, tax consultants, where the tax advisor identification number is displayed on the letterhead, relevant body/association or solicitors confirming that the person (sole trader) is currently trading in Ireland under their own personal name.
  • A brochure, promotional material or other demonstration or documentation of significant investment in the use of the personal trading name.
  • Any other supporting documentation that the IEDR deems acceptable.

Discretionary Domain Names

If your domain name does not fall under any of the above headings you may still apply for a .ie domain. In order to verify your claim to the domain name you will need to provide any of the below (your Accredited .ie Registrar will be able to advise you on what you need to submit with your application):

  • A detailed letter from the applicant outlining their claim on the proposed domain name.
  • In the case that the claim relates to domain name for a product or service that is not yet in the public domain, the applicant must submit information showing that they have invested significant time, effort, or resources in the product or service that directly relates to the proposed domain name.
  • Where the domain name relates to a proposed non-commercial project, information showing that the applicant has invested significant time, effort, or resources in a project that directly relates to the proposed domain name.
  • A brochure, promotional material or other demonstration of significant investment in the project or event may be sufficient.
  • A signed letter on headed paper from a bank manager, firm of chartered accountants, registered auditors, tax consultants, solicitors or relevant professional body/association confirming the applicants claim on the proposed domain name.
  • If the domain is not for trade purposes and is related to the name of a person/individual the applicant  must provide documents which confirm their identity. Acceptable documentation would include a copy of the applicant’s passport, birth certificate, driver’s license or Irish revenue/social welfare document showing their PPS number.
  • If you are a sole trader you should provide documentation to show that the applicant is trading in Ireland. A VAT number or a signed letter on headed paper from an Irish bank manager, firm of chartered accountants, registered auditors, tax consultants or solicitors confirming that the person (sole trader) is currently trading in Ireland.
  • Any other supporting documentation that the Registry deems acceptable.*

Please not that information supporting the “reasonable connection” maybe requested at the discretion of the IEDR.

Registrant Classes

The class selected should represent the nature and legal status of the domain holder.

1. Natural Person/Private Individual

The registrant should be an actual person as opposed to one created by the law (such as a body corporate). The applicant needs to provide a proof of ID that shows that they are a citizen or a resident of the Island of Ireland.

2. Body Corporate (Ltd, PLC, Company)

The applicant must be a public or limited company registered with the Companies Registration Office or any equivalent body in their state. For applicants not based in Ireland or in Northern Ireland, the evidence of a “real and substantive link to Ireland” will be requested.

3. Sole Trader

The registrant must be an existing self-employed person as defined by Ireland Revenue Commissioners and be carrying on their own business, as opposed to being in a partnership, or employed by a company. Applicants need to provide evidence that they are a sole trader. This will depend on the type of self-employment but in general any of the below documents will be acceptable:

  • Notice of Registration from Revenue (This ‘Notice of Registration’ is returned by Revenue when a TR1 Form is submitted by a self-employed entity and it displays your Tax Registration Number.)
  • Registered Business Number (RBN) if you are operating under a business name
  • VAT number
  • Tax exemption determination from Revenue (e.g. artists exemption)
  • A statement of their business account with financial details blacked out
  • A statement from either an accountant, tax advisor or solicitors or bank manager.

4. Unincorporated Association

The registrant should be an Unincorporated Association such as a Partnership, Club or Society, Political Party, Unincorporated Partnership, Solicitor Firm, Band etc.

In cases where more than one Body Corporate, Sole Trader, or Discretionary Applicant are registering a domain, they fall under this class, however must provide normal verification of their status, as if they were each a single applicant. For example:

  • Two companies would each need to provide their CRO numbers.
  • A business partnership would need to provide an RBN or other sole-trader proof in the names of all partners.
  • Three Discretionary Applicants would each need to provide their ID and proof of address.

5. School/Educational Institution

The registrant must be an educational institution such as a national or secondary school, or third level college etc. They must provide either a Roll Number or official letterhead to confirm their status.

6. State Body

The registrant must be a Constitutional body, state agency established by an act or the Oireachtas, or a government department.

7. Discretionary Applicant

The registrant must first make sure that they cannot fit any of classes 1-6 above and should only select the Discretionary Applicant class as a last resort. The Discretionary Applicant must be a citizen or resident (with proof of address) of Ireland or Northern Ireland. They will be requested to provide proof of ID and their address in Ireland/Northern-Ireland along with a detailed claim to the name, and a declaration that they are not a sole trader or body corporate.

If an applicant is in the process of setting up a business, and cannot yet satisfy the requirements to register as a Sole Trader, they may register under this class.

Applicants whose businesses do not require them to register as a normal sole trader, such as an artist earning under the VAT exemption threshold, or who is not yet required to file for Income Tax, may also apply under this class.